alaskablawg.typepad.com > Namagiqua

Photos of various places throughout Alaska

Napaskiak 3

Napaskiak 3

This is the water station in Napaskiak. I am on the left and another attorney from our agency is on the right. A Napaskiak resident is in the middle with a large bucket on the front of his 4-wheeler. The town is small enough that nobody drives cars. All drive 4-wheelers. He will fill the bucket up with water and take back to the storage tank at his house. This type of setup is quite common in rural Alaska, particularly in the Y-K Delta.


Napaskiak 1

Napaskiak 1

This is a honey bucket house. The door on the house is how the honey-bucket emptier gains access to empty the honey bucket.


Napaskiak 2

Napaskiak 2

Here, I'm standing outside a regular home in Napaskiak. The wood sidewalks go throughout the town because the ground is very marshy. The silver piping coming out of the house is the plumbing. There's no indoor plumbing, so the contents of the toilet slide down that pipe intto the small building seen at the lower left of the photo to what is euphemistically called a 'honey bucket'. About once a week those buckets are emptied.


Bethel 1

Bethel 1

Another attorney and I (I'm on the left) are shown coming back from Napaskiak on the Kuskokwim River where we were investigating a homicide case we were assigned to.


Alaska Ferry Dock II

Alaska Ferry Dock II

Here's another picture of the inter-island ferry in dry dock. This picture is a good example of Southeast Alaska geography and weather. Rocky, tumultuous, spruce-covered islands dot the dark ocean seas amidst grey clouds. I think Southeast Alaska is one of the most beautiful places in the world and I think that this picture shows why, to a small degree.


Alaska Ferry Dock

Alaska Ferry Dock

On the right side of this photo, you can see a large ship in dry-dock. This is as close a zoom as I could get. That boat is one of the inter-island ferries that travel throughout southeast Alaska. I think this is the one that ran aground, but in any case, Ketchikan is where they have the facilities to dry-dock and repair such a ship. This was the best angle I could get. I did not want to be obvious about taking pictures or DHS would come knocking on my door, wondering why I was taking pictures of America's infrastructure vulnerabilities. I just think it's cool that they can get a ship that big into a dry dock.


Ketchikan Airport Ferry

Ketchikan Airport Ferry

This was taken while on the ferry between Ketchikan mainland and the Ketchikan airport. The boat on the left is a water taxi that handles passengers only, no cars. The Ketchikan airport is built on an island because there's no room on the mainland. The island, Gravina, has only 50 year-round residents. They've proposed a bridge to connect Ketchikan to its airport and you might have heard of it - it's the infamous 'Bridge to Nowhere'.


Creek street north

Creek street north

Looking north on Creek street.


Dock Fishing

Dock Fishing

A couple of guys fishing for salmon in the small boat harbor in Ketchikan.


Fishing for salmon

Fishing for salmon

This bridge is at the south end of creek street. The people on the bridge are local residents fishing for salmon as they come in on the tide. As high tides come in, salmon ride the influx of water to reach spawning grounds.


Seining ship

Seining ship

A commercial fishing vessel docked in Ketchikan. The layout and the mast structure make me think it's a seiner, meaning that it catches fish via a net configuration sort of like a draw-string purse as opposed to a long volleyball net (drift-net). Seiners generally target shrimp or herring, although in some areas of the state they can also go after salmon. I don't know if you can seine for salmon in southeast. Since most salmon seining is in areas with few permits, I rather doubt it, but I don't know.


Ketchikan Business Close-up

Ketchikan Business Close-up

A bit closer picture of Ketchikan business area. I was experimenting with the zoom on the camera.


Ketchikan Business District

Ketchikan Business District

The Ketchikan business area, viewed across the water from the shopping area. The shopping area is on the southern end of the 'town' (the road continues on south for several miles), and the rest of Ketchikan is in a more northerly direction. This picture looks at the town not designed for cruise tourists.


View across Ketchikan harbor

View across Ketchikan harbor

Southeast Alaska is literally littered with small islands. The 'Bridge to Nowhere' would connect Ketchikan to the island where the airport is. This picture is of a small island across the tourist district. I don't know whether the houses are year-round residences or cabins. Given the weather of Ketchikan (that is, it doesn't freeze up) and the proximity of the houses, I would bet they are more likely year-round residences, but they seemed kind of interesting and so I took the picture.


House in Ketchikan

House in Ketchikan

A typical house near downtown Ketchikan. Notice that one has to climb stais to gain access to the house.


Ketchikan Courthouse

Ketchikan Courthouse

This is the courthouse in Ketchikan. The DA and the PD have their offices here.


House in Ketchikan II

House in Ketchikan II

Another example of the topography in Ketchikan.


Creek Street

Creek Street

This is the famous Creek Street in Ketchikan. This is about mid-tide. High tide comes close to covering all of the timbers. In the 20s and 30s, this was Ketchikan's red-light district. Now, its a shopping area for the cruise-ship tourists.


Archangel Creek2.JPG

Archangel Creek2.JPG

This creek flows into the Little Susitna, pictured below.


Little Su.JPG

Little Su.JPG

The Little Susitna River, again.


Little Su2.JPG

Little Su2.JPG

The Little Susitna River.


Beaver Dam.JPG

Beaver Dam.JPG

Small beaver dam and pond on a hike in Hatcher Pass.


Mint Glacier Valley.JPG

Mint Glacier Valley.JPG

This was taken from the Mint Glacieer Valley trail out of the Hatcher Pass recreational area. This photo looks south as the glacier valley drops away. Taken in August, it is a good idea of the glacially-carved valleys and representative fauna of south central Alaska. It may not look like it, but this is good bear country. Didn't see any that day, but this is the type of country one would look in for bears.


Naknek River

Naknek River

A view as we head up the river to fish.


Morning Mist

Morning Mist

This photo was taken as we left in the morning to go fishing. It is about 8:00 a.m. and approximately 35ยบ with a light mist gently caressing the river.


Trophy Trout

Trophy Trout

Another fine trout taken on the Naknek River. I did not post all of my photos, but enough of different fish to show what Alaska fishing is like.


Upper Ugashik

Upper Ugashik

This is looking north towards the Upper Ugashik Lake. We were fishing the Ugashik Narrows, a short river between Upper and Lower Ugashik lakes. This is pretty typical of tundra scrub in the area, although there are some rolling hills/low mountains to the east in the Becharoff National Wildlife Refuge.


Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

A bald eagle on an old building near Ugashik.


Arctic Char

Arctic Char

A nice 27" char taken with a 10' Loomis GLX and beads.


Ugashik

Ugashik

These are old buildings on the Ugashik Narrows. They were built in the 1940s for people to stay in while fishing. I did not go further since they appeared rather dilapidated and I wanted to spend my time fishing.


Fly Casting

Fly Casting

The water was fairly high, as you can see. Normally at this time of year I would expect the water to be about waist high. Instead, it's almost above my waders.


Naknek Trout

Naknek Trout

A rainbow trout taken on by fly on the Naknek River in September, 2005.